FlexASM Deep Dive – Show Me the Output!!!

If you saw the first FlexASM blog you know we installed and configured FlexASM and a CDB plus a couple of PDBs. Also, this was Policy Managed with a cardinality of 2. Now let’s see what the configuration looks like, and we can break it down using the wonderful crsctl and srvctl tools

First let’s ensure we are really running in FlexASM mode:

[oracle@rac02 ~]$ asmcmd showclustermode
ASM cluster : Flex mode enabled

[oracle@rac02 ~]$ srvctl status serverpool -serverpool naboo
Server pool name: naboo
Active servers count: 2

[oracle@rac01 trace]$ crsctl get node role status -all
Node ‘rac01’ active role is ‘hub’
Node ‘rac03’ active role is ‘hub’
Node ‘rac02’ active role is ‘hub’
Node ‘rac04’ active role is ‘hub’

[oracle@rac01 ~]$ crsctl stat res -t
——————————————————————————–
Name Target State Server State details
——————————————————————————–
Local Resources
——————————————————————————–
ora.ASMNET1LSNR_ASM.lsnr
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE

You notice that we have 4 ASM listeners one on each node in the Cluster. You’ll see the process as the following on each node:

[oracle@rac01 ~]$ ps -ef |grep -i asmnet

ooracle 6646 1 0 12:19 ? 00:00:00 /u01/app/12.1.0/grid/bin/tnslsnr ASMNET1LSNR_ASM -no_crs_notify -inherit

ora.CRSDATA.DATAVOL1.advm
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 Volume device /dev/a
sm/datavol1-194 is o
nline,STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 Volume device /dev/a
sm/datavol1-194 is o
nline,STABLE
ONLINE OFFLINE rac03 Unable to connect to
ASM,STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 Volume device /dev/a
sm/datavol1-194 is o
nline,STABLE
The datavol1 ADVM resource runs on all the nodes where indicated it should run. In this case we are seeing that RAC03 is having some issues.
Let’s look into that a little later. But I like the fact crsctl tells something is amiss here on node3

ora.CRSDATA.dg
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
OFFLINE OFFLINE rac04 STABLE

ora.FRA.dg
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
OFFLINE OFFLINE rac04 STABLE

The crsdata and fra disk groups resource is started on all nodes except node 4

ora.LISTENER.lsnr
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE

We all know, as in 11gR2, that this is the Node listener.

ora.PDBDATA.dg
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
OFFLINE OFFLINE rac04 STABLE

The pdbdata disk groups resource is started on all nodes except node 4

ora.crsdata.datavol1.acfs
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 mounted on /u02/app/
oracle/acfsmounts,ST
ABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 mounted on /u02/app/
oracle/acfsmounts,ST
ABLE
ONLINE OFFLINE rac03 (2) volume /u02/app/
oracle/acfsmounts of
fline,STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 mounted on /u02/app/
oracle/acfsmounts,ST
ABLE

ACFS filesystem resource for datavol1 is started on all nodes except node3.
But I think the following has something to do w/ it :-). Need to debug this a bit later. I even tried:
[oracle@rac03 ~]$ asmcmd volenable –all
ASMCMD-9470: ASM proxy instance unavailable
ASMCMD-9471: cannot enable or disable volumes

ora.net1.network
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE
ora.ons
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE

The Network (in my case I only have only Net1) and ONS are same as in previous versions

ora.proxy_advm
ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ONLINE OFFLINE rac03 STABLE
ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE

Yep, since proxy_advm is not started on node3, the filesystems won’t come online….but again, i’ll look at that later
——————————————————————————–
Cluster Resources
——————————————————————————–
ora.LISTENER_SCAN1.lsnr
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ora.LISTENER_SCAN2.lsnr
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ora.LISTENER_SCAN3.lsnr
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE
ora.MGMTLSNR
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 169.254.90.36 172.16
.11.10,STABLE
ora.asm
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
2 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
3 ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE

Since we have the cardinality of 3 ASM instance we have 3 ASM resources active

ora.cvu
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ora.mgmtdb
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 Open,STABLE
ora.oc4j
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ora.rac01.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 STABLE
ora.rac02.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ora.rac03.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ora.rac04.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE
ora.scan1.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac02 STABLE
ora.scan2.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac03 STABLE
ora.scan3.vip
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac04 STABLE
ora.tatooine.db
1 ONLINE ONLINE rac01 Open,STABLE
2 ONLINE ONLINE rac02 Open,STABLE

As we stated above, I specified a Policy Managed database with cardinality of 2, so I have 2 database instances running
——————————————————————————–

Here’s some other important supporting info on FlexASm:

[oracle@rac02 ~]$ srvctl config asm -detail
ASM home: /u01/app/12.1.0/grid
Password file: +CRSDATA/orapwASM
ASM listener: LISTENER
ASM is enabled.
ASM instance count: 3
Cluster ASM listener: ASMNET1LSNR_ASM

[oracle@rac02 ~]$ srvctl status filesystem
ACFS file system /u02/app/oracle/acfsmounts is mounted on nodes rac01,rac02,rac04

ANd here’s what the Database has to say about FlexASM

NOTE: ASMB registering with ASM instance as client 0x10001 (reg:1377584805)
NOTE: ASMB connected to ASM instance +ASM1 (Flex mode; client id 0x10001)
NOTE: ASMB rebuilding ASM server state
NOTE: ASMB rebuilt 2 (of 2) groups
SUCCESS: ASMB reconnected & completed ASM server state

So for the interesting part:
If you notice that ASM is not running node 4:
[oracle@rac02 ~]$ srvctl status asm -v

ASM is running on rac01,rac02,rac03
[oracle@rac02 ~]$ srvctl status asm -detail
ASM is running on rac01,rac02,rac03

So, how does a client (ocrdump, rman, asmcmd, etc..) connect to if ASM if there is no ASM on that node. Well let’s test this using asmcmd on node4. You notice that a pipe is created, a connect string is generated and passed to ASMCMD to connect remotely to ASM2 on node2!!!!

22-Sep-13 12:54 ASMCMD Foreground (PID = 14106): Pipe /tmp/pipe_14106 has been found.
22-Sep-13 12:54 ASMCMD Background (PID = 14117): Successfully opened the pipe /tmp/pipe_14106
22-Sep-13 12:54 ASMCMD Foreground (PID = 14106): Successfully opened the pipe /tmp/pipe_14106 in read mode
NOTE: Executing kfod /u01/app/12.1.0/grid/bin/kfod op=getclstype..
22-Sep-13 12:54 Printing the connection string
contype =
driver =
instanceName = <>
usr =
ServiceName = <+ASM>
23-Sep-13 16:23 Successfully connected to ASM instance +ASM2
23-Sep-13 16:23 NOTE: Querying ASM instance to get list of disks
22-Sep-13 12:54 Registered Daemon process.
22-Sep-13 12:54 ASMCMD Foreground (PID = 14106): Closed pipe /tmp/pipe_14106.

Creating PDBs part 3

Due to so many people asking me other methods besides SQLplus for provisioning PDBs; such as OEM, DBCA, etc. In this blog entry I’ll DBCA, just because its simple to show. As I mentioned in my last PDB blog,
the installer DBCA (initial DBA invocation) looks different than the subsequent (post initial db creation).

The main DBCA screen shows the following pages. We will choose Manage Pluggable Database

PDB12c 2013 08 20 17 46 20

Choose the CDB, Note you could have many CDBs on the same Node or RAC cluster

PDB12c 2013 08 30 17 51 59

We choose our PDB that we created in Part 1 of the blog

PDB12c 2013 08 30 17 52 39

Ahh..we gotta open the PDB first. As before:

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=pdbobi;
Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbobi open;

Pluggable database altered.

or CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database all open;

PDB12c 2013 08 30 17 54 22

Now we can Add support for and configure Database Vault. Additionally, Label Security can be configured.
It would have been nice to enable and modify Resource Manager as well other PDB tasks.
But I get the fact that this DBCA is really driven for the PDB operations (plug,unplug, create and destroy PDB).
Bulk of the PDB admin tasks are provided in EM

PDB12c 2013 08 30 18 14 54

Let’s do a new PDB creation for grins 🙂

PDB12c 2013 08 30 18 21 01

Specify the PDB name, storage location, and a default tablespace. Again, it would have been nice to specify a TEMP tablespace too, but that was left out

PDB12c 2013 08 30 18 22 26

Progress ….

PDB12c 2013 08 30 18 23 18

And Completion….Pretty Straightforward

PDB12c 2013 08 30 18 22 53

Creating PDB’s part 2

Once we have installed 12.1 Database Software, we can create the Container Database and the Pluggable Databases. In my case I did a software only install then manually executed DBCA

In this blog entry I’ll show the screens that walk-thru the configuration of the “first” database. I noticed that once DBCA is used to create the initial database, the capability and options (screens) for DBCA are different; i.e., it much more aligned to create/manage additional databases. I’ll show those screens in Part 3 of PDB

So let’s get started by executing
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/dbca

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 39 12

Choose Advanced mode for Policy Managed Database or use “Default Configuration”. Being a big promoter of Policy Managed Databases and since I have 4 RAC nodes (my best practice threshold to choose Policy Managed), I’ll choose, that.

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 39 44

I’ll pick a Global Database name and choose PDB option, and also option to choose how many PDBs to create (with prefix)

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 40 30

Pick a Server Pool name, I chose a cardinality of 2

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 40 58

Define the Management Options

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 41 20

Choose the Storage locations

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 43 31

Define Database Vault Owner and also the Separate Account Manager. Note the user name definitions

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 45 31

And now the finish

Rac01 2013 09 15 22 56 41

Creating PDBs

Consolidate where possible …Isolate where necessary

In the last blog I mentioned the benefits of schema consolidation and how it dove tails directly into a 12c Oracle Database PDB implementation.
In this part 2 of the PDB blog, we will get a little more detailed and do a basic walk-through, from “cradle to grave” of a PDB. We’ll use SQlPlus as the tool of choice, next time I’ll show w/ DBCA

First verify that we are truly on 12c Oracle database

SQL> select instance_name, version, status, con_id from v$instance;

INSTANCE_NAME VERSION STATUS CON_ID
—————- —————– ———— ———-
yoda 12.1.0.1.0 OPEN 0

The v$database view tells us that we are dealing with a CDB based database

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select cdb, con_id from v$database;

CDB CON_ID
— ———-
YES 0

or a more elegant way:

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select NAME, DECODE(CDB, ‘YES’, ‘Multitenant Option enabled’, ‘Regular 12c Database: ‘) “Multitenant Option ?” , OPEN_MODE, CON_ID from V$DATABASE;

NAME Multitenant Option ? OPEN_MODE CON_ID
——— ————————– ——————– ———-
YODA Multitenant Option enabled READ ONLY 0

There are alot of new views and tables to support PBD/CDB. But we’ll focus on the v$PDBS and CDB_PDBS views:

CDB$ROOT@YODA> desc v$pdbs
Name
——–
CON_ID
DBID
CON_UID
GUID
NAME
OPEN_MODE
RESTRICTED
OPEN_TIME
CREATE_SCN
TOTAL_SIZE

CDB$ROOT@YODA> desc cdb_pdbs
Name
——–
PDB_ID
PDB_NAME
DBID
CON_UID
GUID
STATUS
CREATION_SCN
CON_ID

The SQlPlus command con_name (container name) shows the container and the con_id we are connected to:

CDB$ROOT@YODA> show con_name

CON_NAME
——————————
CDB$ROOT

CDB$ROOT@YODA> show con_id

CON_ID
——————————
1

Let’s see what PDBs that are created in this CDB and their current state:

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select CON_ID,DBID,NAME,TOTAL_SIZE from v$pdbs;

CON_ID DBID NAME TOTAL_SIZE
———- ———- —————————— ———-
2 4066465523 PDB$SEED 283115520
3 483260478 PDBOBI 0

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select con_id, name, open_mode from v$pdbs;

CON_ID NAME OPEN_MODE
———- ——————– ———-
2 PDB$SEED READ ONLY
3 PDBOBI MOUNTED

Recall from part 1 of the blog series, that we created a PDB (pdbobi) when we specified the Pluggable Database Feature on install, and that a PDB$SEED got created as part of that Install process

Now lets’s connect to the two different PDBs and see what they got!! You really shouldn’t ever connect to PDB$SEED, since its just used as a template, but we’re just curious 🙂

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=PDB$SEED;
Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select name from v$datafile;

NAME
——————————————————————————–
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/undotbs1.260.823892155
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7C48AA5A4404A2E04325AAE80A403C/DATAFILE/system.271.823892297
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7C48AA5A4404A2E04325AAE80A403C/DATAFILE/sysaux.270.823892297

As you can see that PDB$SEED houses the template tablespaces -> System, Sysaux, and Undo tablespaces

If we connect back to the root-CDB, we see that it houses essentially the traditional database tablespaces (like in pre-12c days).

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=cdb$root;
Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select name from v$datafile;

NAME
——————————————————————————–
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/system.258.823892109
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/sysaux.257.823892063
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/undotbs1.260.823892155
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7C48AA5A4404A2E04325AAE80A403C/DATAFILE/system.271.823892297
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/users.259.823892155
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7C48AA5A4404A2E04325AAE80A403C/DATAFILE/sysaux.270.823892297
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/system.276.823892813
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/sysaux.274.823892813
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/users.277.823892813
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/example.275.823892813

BTW, the datafiles listed in V$datafiles differs from cbd_data_files. cdb_data_files only shows datafiles from “open” PDB, so just be careful if you’re looking for correct datafile

Let’s connect to our user PDB (pdbobi) and see what we can see 🙂

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=pdbobi;
Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select con_id, name, open_mode from v$pdbs;

CON_ID NAME OPEN_MODE
———- —————– ———–
3 PDBOBI MOUNTED

Place PDBOBI in Read Write mode. Note, that when you create the PDB, it is initially in mounted mode with a status of NEW.
View the OPEN MODE status of a PDB by querying the OPEN_MODE column in the V$PDBS view or view the status of a PDB by querying the STATUS column of the CDB_PDBS or DBA_PDBS view

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbobi open;

Pluggable database altered.

or CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database all open;

And let’s create a new tablespace in this PDB

CDB$ROOT@YODA> create tablespace obiwan datafile size 500M;

Tablespace created.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select file_name from cdb_data_files;

FILE_NAME
——————————————————————————–
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/example.275.823892813
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/users.277.823892813
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/sysaux.274.823892813
+PDBDATA/YODA/E456D87DF75E6553E043EDFE10AC71EA/DATAFILE/obiwan.284.824683339
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/system.276.823892813

PDBOBI only has scope for its own PDB files. We will illustrate this further down below.

Let’s create a new clone from an existing PDB, but with a new path

CDB$ROOT@YODA> create pluggable database PDBvader from PDBOBI FILE_NAME_CONVERT=(‘+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE’,’+PDBDATA’);
create pluggable database PDBvader from PDBOBI FILE_NAME_CONVERT=(‘+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE’,’+PDBDATA’)
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-65040: operation not allowed from within a pluggable database

CDB$ROOT@YODA> show con_name

CON_NAME
——————————
PDBOBI

Hmm…..remember we were still connected to PDBOBI. You can only create PDBs from root (and not even from pdb$seed). So connect to CDBROOT

CDB$ROOT@YODA> create pluggable database PDBvader from PDBOBI FILE_NAME_CONVERT=(‘+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE’,’+PDBDATA’);

Pluggable database created.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select pdb_name, status from cdb_pdbs;

PDB_NAME STATUS
———- ————-
PDBOBI NORMAL
PDB$SEED NORMAL
PDBVADER NORMAL

And

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select CON_ID,DBID,NAME,TOTAL_SIZE from v$pdbs;

CON_ID DBID NAME TOTAL_SIZE
———- ———- ————- ————-
2 4066465523 PDB$SEED 283115520
3 483260478 PDBOBI 917504000
4 994649056 PDBVADER 0

Hmm……the TOTAL_SIZE column shows 0 bytes. Recall that all new PDBs are created and placed in MOUNTED stated

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=pdbvader;

Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database open;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select file_name from cdb_data_files;

FILE_NAME
——————————————————————————–
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/system.280.823980769
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/sysaux.279.823980769
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/users.281.823980769
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/example.282.823980769

Viola…. size is now reflected !!

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select CON_ID,DBID,NAME,TOTAL_SIZE from v$pdbs;

CON_ID DBID NAME TOTAL_SIZE
———- ———- —————————— ———-
4 994649056 PDBVADER 393216000

Again, the scope of PDBVADER is to its own container files; it can’t see PDBOBI files at all. If we connect back to cdb$root and look at v$datafile, we see that cdb$root has scope for all the datafiles in the CDB database

Incidentally, that long identifier, “E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89”, in the OMF name is the GUID or Global Identifier for that PDB. This is not the same as container unique identifier (CON_UID). The con_uid is a local
identifier; whereas the GUID is universal. Keep in mind that we can unplug a PDB from one CDB into another CDB, so the GUID provides this uniqueness and streamlines portability.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select name, con_id from v$datafile order by con_id

NAME CON_ID
———————————————————————————– ———-
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/undotbs1.260.823892155 1
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/sysaux.257.823892063 1
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/system.258.823892109 1
+PDBDATA/YODA/DATAFILE/users.259.823892155 1
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7C48AA5A4404A2E04325AAE80A403C/DATAFILE/system.271.823892297 2
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7C48AA5A4404A2E04325AAE80A403C/DATAFILE/sysaux.270.823892297 2
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/example.275.823892813 3
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/users.277.823892813 3
+PDBDATA/YODA/E456D87DF75E6553E043EDFE10AC71EA/DATAFILE/obiwan.284.824683339 3
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/system.276.823892813 3
+PDBDATA/YODA/DD7D8C1D4C234B38E04325AAE80AF577/DATAFILE/sysaux.274.823892813 3
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/sysaux.279.823980769 4
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/users.281.823980769 4
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/example.282.823980769 4
+PDBDATA/YODA/E46B24386A131109E043EDFE10AC6E89/DATAFILE/system.280.823980769 4

Now that we are done testing with PDBVADER PDB, we can shutdown and drop this PDB

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=cdb$root;

Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> drop pluggable database pdbvader including datafiles;
drop pluggable database pdbvader including datafiles
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-65025: Pluggable database PDBVADER is not closed on all instances.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbvader close;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> drop pluggable database pdbvader including datafiles;

Pluggable database dropped.

Just for completeness, I’ll illustrate couple different ways to create a PDB

The beauty of PDB is not mobility (plug and unplug), which we’ll show later, but that we can create/clone a new PDB from a “gold-image PDB” . That’s real agility and a Database as a Service (DbaaS) play.

So let’s create a new PDB in a couple of different ways.

Method #1: Create a PDB from SEED
CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=cdb$root;

Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE pdbhansolo admin user hansolo identified by hansolo roles=(dba);

Pluggable database created.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbhansolo open;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select file_name from cdb_data_files;

FILE_NAME
——————————————————————————–
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF22127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/system.280.824693889
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF22127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/sysaux.279.824693893

Notice that it just contains the basic files to enable a PDB. The CDB will copy from the PDB$SEED the System and Sysaux tablesapces and instantiate them in the new PDB.

Method #2: Clone from an existing PDB (PDBOBI in our case)

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter session set container=cdb$root;

Session altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbobi close;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbobi open read only;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE pdbleia from pdbobi;

Pluggable database created.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> alter pluggable database pdbleia open;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT@YODA> select file_name from cdb_data_files;

FILE_NAME
——————————————————————————–
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF23127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/system.281.824694649
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF23127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/sysaux.282.824694651
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF23127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/users.285.824694661
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF23127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/example.286.824694661
+PDBDATA/YODA/E51109E2AF23127AE043EDFE10AC1DD9/DATAFILE/obiwan.287.824694669

Notice, that the OBI tablespace that we created in PDBOBI came over as part of this Clone process!!

You can also create a PDB as a snapshot (COW) from another PDB. I’ll post this test on the next blog report. But essentially you’ll need a NAS Appliannce, or any technology that will provide you with COW snapshot.
I plan on using ACFS as the storage container and ACFS RW Snapshot for the snapshot PDB.

A 12c Flex Cluster Installation Walk-thru

Let’s start the 12c Flex install, with the execution of the traditional runInstaller script

Rac12c1 2013 07 30 22 55 32

Let’s choose Install 12c Flex Cluster

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And yes we picking English… since we live in English-land

Rac12c1 2013 07 30 22 56 29

Now let’s specify the Scan information and yes, we’ll need to define GNS and since we have to use GNS, we’ll need to get DNS domain delegation setup. In our case we have us.viscosityna-test.com as the sub-domain

Rac12c1 2013 07 30 22 57 07

This is the new stuff!! We define which nodes in the cluster will be Hubs and which will be Leaf. Note, you’ll ocassionaly hear the terms Hub and RIM be used interchangeably. It just historical!

Rac12c1 2013 07 30 22 57 42

Let’s specify the interfaces. You all have seen this screen before. But it now got a small twist to it. You can specify a separate “ASM &Private” networks.

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Now the validation!

Rac12c1 2013 07 30 23 01 02

This step is new too. You have the option to configure Grid Infrastructure Repository,
which is used for storing Cluster Health Monitor (CHM) data. In 11gR2 this was stored
in a Berkley DB database and was created by default. Now this option allows users to
specify a Oracle Database to store the CHM data. This database is a single instance
database that is named MGMTDB by default. It is an internal CRS resource, which has
HA-failover capabilities. I’ll cover this topic in more detail later, but I should
mention that this is the only opportunity to create this repository; i,e, you have
uninstall/reinstall to get this GI repos option.

Rac12c1 2013 07 30 23 00 38

Now the fun stuff! Let’s create the ASM disk group. Note, that if you are configuring a GI repo, then you’ll need a minimum of 5GB disk (for testers and laptop folks).

Rac12c1 2013 07 31 17 47 57

Now define passwords

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Verify…and yes we’re cool w/ the passwords

Rac12c1 2013 07 31 17 49 00

No IPMI

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No define the group definitions

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Where we gonna put the Oracle Home and Oracle Base

Rac12c1 2013 07 31 17 52 41

Now this really cool. I can specify the root password/credentials, for downstream root required actions.

Rac12c1 2013 07 31 18 02 05

Gotta run some fix some things, execute fixup.sh script

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Now off to the races !!!

Rac12c1 2013 07 31 23 33 54

My new Favorite RAC-Clusterware command

My new favorite 12c Oracle Clusterware command is the 'crsctl stat res "resource name" -dependency'

What this command does, is to provide a dependency tree structure for resource the in question.  This will display startup (default) and shutdown dependencies.  

From this we can understand the pull-up, pushdown, weak, and hard dependencies between clusterware resources 


[oracle@rac02 ~]$ crsctl stat res ora.dagobah.db -dependency
================================================================================
Resource Start Dependencies
================================================================================
---------------------------------ora.dagobah.db---------------------------------
ora.dagobah.db(ora.database.type)->
| type:ora.listener.type[weak:type]
| | type:ora.cluster_vip_net1.type[hard:type,pullup:type]
| | | ora.net1.network(ora.network.type)[hard,pullup]
| | | ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
| type:ora.scan_listener.type[weak:type:global]
| | ora.scan1.vip(ora.scan_vip.type)[hard,pullup]
| | | ora.net1.network(ora.network.type)[hard,pullup:global]
| | | ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
| | | type:ora.scan_vip.type[dispersion:type:active]
| | type:ora.scan_listener.type[dispersion:type:active]
| ora.ons(ora.ons.type)[weak:uniform]
| | ora.net1.network(ora.network.type)[hard,pullup]
| ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
| ora.PDBDATA.dg(ora.diskgroup.type)[weak:global:uniform]
| | ora.asm(ora.asm.type)[hard,pullup:always]
| | | ora.LISTENER.lsnr(ora.listener.type)[weak]
| | | | type:ora.cluster_vip_net1.type[hard:type,pullup:type]
| | | | | ora.net1.network(ora.network.type)[hard,pullup]
| | | | | ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
| | | ora.ASMNET1LSNR_ASM.lsnr(ora.asm_listener.type)[hard,pullup]
| | | | ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
| ora.FRA.dg(ora.diskgroup.type)[hard:global:uniform,pullup:global]
| | ora.asm(ora.asm.type)[hard,pullup:always]
| | | ora.LISTENER.lsnr(ora.listener.type)[weak]
| | | | type:ora.cluster_vip_net1.type[hard:type,pullup:type]
| | | | | ora.net1.network(ora.network.type)[hard,pullup]
| | | | | ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
| | | ora.ASMNET1LSNR_ASM.lsnr(ora.asm_listener.type)[hard,pullup]
| | | | ora.gns<Resource not found>[weak:global]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now the same for shutdown (pushdown) dependencies

[oracle@rac02 ~]$ crsctl stat res ora.dagobah.db -dependency -stop
================================================================================
Resource Stop Dependencies
================================================================================
---------------------------------ora.dagobah.db---------------------------------
ora.dagobah.db(ora.database.type)->
| ora.dagobah.hoth.svc(ora.service.type)[hard:intermediate]
| ora.dagobah.r2d2.svc(ora.service.type)[hard:intermediate]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Why is this command and output important?  Well, in cases where a particular resource doesn't come up, you may want to understand relationship with its dependents
The reason is, if you are creating your own resource dependencies using the CRS API (formally known as CLSCRS API).

<pre>CLSCRS is a set of C-based APIs for Oracle Clusterware. The CLSCRS APIs enable you to manage the operation of entities that are managed by Oracle Clusterware. These entities include resources, resource types, servers, and server pools. You can use the APIs to register user applications with Oracle Clusterware so that the clusterware can manage them and maintain high availability. Once an application is registered, you can manage, monitor and query the application's status.  The APIs allow you to use the callbacks for diagnostic logging.

</pre>